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Jul262010

1943 - "Scrap Day"

January

Greetings to all our dear Sisters!  After a rather mild December, January brought us some real winter weather.  There was not much snow, but there was very low temperatures.  We had frozen pipes almost before we realized how cold it was.  The worst part of the cold was just at the time of the examinations.

The workmen continued work in the old cloister even on New Year’s Day.  We permitted it because it is so difficult to get help and because the government officials worked and urged others to work as a war measure.

We were happy to learn that Sister Dolores is so much improved that she will be permitted to teach a little while each day in St. Agnes Academy, Alliance.  This was good news, and we hope that her recovery is permanent.

When the children returned after Christmas, they showed results of the measles epidemic.  Those who returned were weak and listless.   Several did not get back for a week or two.  The disease seems to have been spread all through this section.

The girls had been asking a long time to be permitted to play basketball.  A group was organized in January under the leadership of Alma Wallace and Jean Biglin.  The girls play twice a week and enjoy themselves.

In the Holt County Tournament our team was “runner-up”.  The new suits looked very fine, but did not bring the championship.  The Alumnae cheered the boys up by sponsoring a dance after the tournament.

As happened last year, so again this year, the Senior class was saddened by the death of a parent.  This year it was Colonel Francis Brennan, the father of two of the Senior boys.

We were all made happy by a short visit of Sister George and Sister Agnesine.  We kept Sister George busy visiting her old haunts and renewing acquaintances with her former pupils.  We hope every Sister will make O’Neill a stopping place, no matter where she is going.  We love company.

Rebecca Kane, who had been chosen president of the Senior Class, had to move with her parents to South Dakota.  Rebecca has been a good president and we were sorry to lose her.  John Hynes succeeded her in office.

The school office which for many years had been in the corridor was moved to the room at the head of the stairs.  The furniture was moved and the room was ready for occupancy on January thirteenth.

All the activities in the Senior year had to be ahead this year on account of labor shortage.  Therefore January found us measuring caps and gowns, ordering invitations, having pictures taken, and even rushing in the Junior-Senior banquet before the food rationing.  The war touches even these things, and puts an unnaturalness about them.

On Thursday, January 14, the workmen finally finished the work in the old cloister and moved out.  How happy we were to be back in our clean cells and to get the dirt and dust out of the cloister.  Since July, we had been living in make-shift fashion.  Not all the work is completed, but we can finish the woodwork in vacation.  We are well satisfied with the repairs and the appearance of the cloister.

The Junior-Senior banquet was given in our dining room on January twentieth.  Dona Gallagher, the toastmistress, took the theme of the “wind” and the “rain” and worked it into her introductory speeches.  The pupils had a lovely banquet.  After the toasts they went to the gym for an informal dance and later in the evening they were chaperoned to a theater party.

Near the end of January we noticed a disease among the children, which was called mumps at first, but it proved not to be mumps but swollen glands.  The children were very sick.  We learned later that this was also part of an epidemic passing over the country.  It seems wars bring such things.

February

We had expected to have retreat for the high school at the close of the semester.  However, Rev. Father Stroh, S.J., lost his voice and was a week late in coming to us.  Our Blessed Mother probably wanted it that way, for retreat began on her feast, February second, and closed on the first Friday.  It was a splendid retreat.  The conduct of the children was unusually good.  Father spoke clearly and simply.  He fitted his stories and timed his jokes in a way that shows he knows how to handle young people.  There is no doubt but that he did a great deal of good among the children.  His Question Box in the evening was most interesting.

On the tenth of February the fourth grade entertained us with an assembly ‘Too Many Flags’.   The children showed the careful training Sr. Edmunda had given them and it is certain they know more about the flags of the colonies now than they did before.

The boarders celebrated Valentine’s Day by a little party in the dining room and a dance in the upper corridor after supper.  The corridor was decorated and each child received a valentine crown which Sr. Maxine had made for the occasion.

In the District Tournament held at Atkinson our team won in the first round but lost in the second which put us out of the tournament.  Our team is composed chiefly of ninth grade boys and they lack endurance.  They are gaining in experience and we hope they will be good players in a year or so.

March

Monsignor McNamara has a way of celebrating his birthday which is “different.”  He does not sit around waiting for presents. He comes over to the school and presents each child and each Sister with a pound box of candy.  The children sing their good wishes to him and he thoroughly enjoys it.  This year he added a free half day to his gift.

Gerry Greybiel who had been our athletic coach was called to the west coast, and on that account was obliged to leave us.  The children of the school and especially the team wanted to show appreciation, so they invited him to the gym in order to present a gift and to give him a good cheer.  The boys were sorry to see him go.

We could not have the usual kind of Mission Bazaar this year because of the difficulty in getting food and articles for the booths.  We decided that a war bond would bring about as much money as we usually made for the Missions, so we conducted a raffle of a $25 bond.  The bond was won by a Junior girl and we made a good amount for the Missions. 

The weather became exceedingly cold during the first days of March.  On March 7 it was 24° below zero; bright clear weather, but very cold.

Sr. Maxine entered the drawing of Helen Adrian in the Art Contest conducted by the Scholastic magazine.  Sister was eager to see the type of work sent in by other schools, so she was given permission to visit the display in Omaha.  Our pupil won a citation and was awarded a certificate in the district.  Her drawings were later sent to the National Contest in Pittsburg.  The attendants at the Art display took Sister through room after room to see the different furnishings, china, and draperies, and explained that such a model room was frequently sold entirely to one person.  The cost is in the thousands.  The Art display and the whole trip was most instructive and encouraging.

Our St. Patrick’s play was the “Wishing Well.”  The play was well done.  The weather was a little milder, making it possible for a good crowd to attend.  The stage setting was very pretty and the Fairy Dance was particularly good.

Sr. Flores and the music students attended the music clinic at Norfolk and found it helpful even though it was not just what we needed most.  Our committee on music in this district seems to have felt the restrictions of rationing rather too keenly and they have thought that the matter of music would be more or less curtailed.  Therefore the committee failed in organization and management and for that reason the clinic was not so good. 

Representatives of the East and of the Midwest met in Chicago on March 23 for the Catholic Educational Convention.  It was a great joy to met our dear Sisters again, to hear news of the East and to exchange ideas.  The speakers at the Convention urged the shortening of the grade school course to six years.  Many agreed that this could be done; but when it came to changing the time of the high school and of the college, there was warm discussion.  We shall probably continue our present set-up for some years.  There were strong pleas for home making courses in our schools, and for retaining the classics.  The subject of “Victory Corps” in the schools was viewed quite differently by different speakers.  Dr. George Johnson seemed to disapprove.

April

April opened with a trip to Omaha to attend the Sodality Convention.  The meetings were held in St. John’s hall at Creighton.  The subject was “Youth and Sacrifice”.  It did not take long for the discussion to get started and portable microphones made it possible to hear the remarks clearly.  The conduct of the children was excellent.  Our group made the trip by riding two nights on the train and needless to say, sleep was the greatest need when we arrived back at the Academy.

Sr. Adeltrude picked up a germ somewhere and was very sick with erysipelas for a few days.  Thanks to the sulfa drug, the germ was killed very soon, but Sister’s face was in bad condition for some time.

During Vocation Week we had joint meetings of the three Sodalities in order to discuss vocations.  The discussions got lively and “out of many hearts, thoughts were revealed”.  It is a consolation to us as teachers to find out that our children know what is right and that our teaching has not been in vain.  What the children do after they leave school is often disappointing, but at least we have taught them the truth.

Our committee in District III bungled again in its management of the Music Contest.  The members of the committee were not interested in the contest and feared that on account of gas rationing there would not be schools enough taking part to warrant the expense. 

The people of O’Neill, with Mr. George’s help, had quite other thoughts.  The people determined to have a festival, to invite schools in this district, and to raise funds for paying the judges by subscription if necessary.  Twenty-three schools responded.  

St. Mary’s alone had 35 entries and succeeded in rating 15 superiors, 14 excellent and 6 goods.  To everyone’s satisfaction the members of the music committee were not re-elected so we have reason to think that the music activities will be better handled next year.

May

After her long illness, Sister Dolores finally gained strength enough to make the trip home and arrived here on May 2.  We were all much surprised and very glad to see Sister looking so well.  Her recovery seemed almost a miracle.  She started to work in the office immediately, and enjoyed many a little visit with the pupils passing by.

 

The Seniors chose as their class pay “Don’t Take My Penny”.  It was given May 7.  The pupils did very well, the crowd was large and we were well satisfied with the results both dramatically and financially.

On May 11 we had a snow storm.  This has happened before in Nebraska, but it is unusual and it is not good for the crops.  The snow was gone by May 13.

The girls of the music department gave a formal recital on May 13.  The poor children were in agony and so were we, but the whole thing went well and it is good training for the children.  The boys insisted on having a recital of their own.  This one was agony for a few of the boys, but it was pure fun for most of the boys and for us.  It was a rare treat to see the football players imitating the “Fairy Dance” of March 17.  No fairies ever had such legs and such muscular arms as we saw that night!

From May 8 to May 28 the days whirled by in rapid succession, each filled with practicing, housecleaning, parties, picnics and of course school work.  The Seniors were treated several times and entertained by the different classes.  At the final assembly in the gym the music awards were distributed and then the children paid a farewell tribute to Sr. Dolores.  They did not realize all that Sister had meant to the school during all these years, but they tried to express their gratitude and appreciation in their own way.  Immediately following this assembly we had our May Crowning and procession.  The park forms an ideal setting for this beautiful ceremony, and this year the park was at its best.  After the crowning the pupils marched in procession to Church for Benediction.  We can always expect an especially good talk from Monsignor because he dearly loves our Blessed Mother.

The grade school closed on May 21.  Monsignor thinks a great deal of the grade school and always enjoys the program and the distribution of the awards. 

On Sunday, May 23 the Alumnae began the reunion by attending the 9:00 o’clock Mass and receiving Holy Communion.  Breakfast was served at the Bakery and the Senior class was invited.  There was no Alumnae banquet this year for obvious reasons.  In the afternoon a lovely reception was given honoring St. Dolores.  It was hard for Sister to go through this meeting, knowing that it would probably be the last time she would meet these girls for whom she had sacrificed her life.  The Alumnae presented Sister with a beautiful watch.

On May 27 the Seniors met for the Class Night exercises.  Outstanding in the program was the playing of Bert Brennan on the trombone and of Margaret Ryan on the clarinet.  Both pupils had taken part in the Music Contest and their playing was excellent.

Graduation took place at 10:30 in the church.  Afterwards there was the usual rush of picture-taking and packing and farewell until nearly six P.M.  After that the house settled into the vacation calmness.

We were glad to welcome Sr. Bartholomew, who came to assist in the vacation school at Ewing.  On Sunday evening the missionaries all left for Ewing, St. John’s and Brunswick.  In a way it is a vacation for the Sisters, but it is hard work and the conditions of living and teaching are far from ideal.  We hope that eternity will show how much good has been done in these parishes.

June

The big work in June is to get the house cleaned.  We had excellent help from the Sisters this year because not so many went out for vacation school.  The music rooms and the corridor were fitted out with light colored new linoleum.  The music rooms have been much easier to clean since the linoleum has been put down.  The whole house was gone over quite thoroughly and that was a big job.

The departure for summer schools and for retreat came about the same time.  Sisters Serafica and Ludgardis enjoyed a fine retreat at St. Francis Mission.  Sisters Fides, Spes, Laurissa and Laurita went to Creighton.  We had no end of difficulty getting rooms for them.  Since the cadets have taken over Creighton there are no accommodations for Sisters there at all.  Duchesne finally opened for Sisters and we were fortunate in getting room and board there.  The Madams were grand to the Sisters, and the Sisters appreciated living in a convent with all its religious advantages.

Sister Adeltrude spent the summer in St. Benedicts; Sisters Flores and Xavier studied in Leavenworth, and Sister Leonita in Davenport.       

During the summer there were only 12 of us at home.  We changed the daily program to fit our small community and settled into a regular summer routine.  Our recreations were most enjoyable because of the lovely stories we read during them.  It was delightful to sit on the front steps after a hot day and listen to a good story.  Sometimes we were joined by visitors who stopped to enjoy our nice cool place.  Sr. Eugene Biglin, O.S.B. spent a short restful vacation with us.  We can all look back to last summer and recall most pleasant memories. 

On June 15 Sisters Florence and Marina came for summer school work, and Sr. Agnesine came to join our community permanently.  Both Sr. Florence and Sr. Marina did excellent work and by the end of the summer they had accomplished so much in Art and in Drawing that they were able to make a big display in the studio.  Sister Maxine worked hard and enjoyed the progress they made.

On June 18 word came that Sr. Dolores and Sr. Ursula were to travel to the East.  Sr. Dolores spent a few days in Sioux City for a final check up and was found to be in very good condition considering what she had been through.  On June 29 Sr. Dolores and Sr. Ursula left for Stella.  Sr. Dolores had completed twenty five years of teaching in St. Mary’s;  she had given the best years of her life to the school and there must be stored up in heaven a rich reward for her.  Sr. Ursula had spent only a year at St. Mary’s but that was long enough to show her generous heart and her hard working ability in school.  The prayers and good wishes of all follow these Sisters into their new Province.

Our dining room had long needed repairs and this summer we succeeded in getting material such as we had used in the cloister.  There was some difficulty in getting workmen but when they came it did not take long to finish the work.  More light fixtures were installed, the woodwork was painted and new drapes were hung.  The room is really most attractive now and is a great improvement.

A great storm arose on the evening of July 26.  The lightening was exceedingly sharp and close.  The tower of the Church was struck again by a flash that ripped off the slate and gave us all a thorough fright.

August

The month started out with very hot weather.  The Sisters gradually returned from summer school making our refectory look natural again.  But it was not for long.

On the second of August the changes came and our family began to scatter.  Sisters Spes, Adeltrude and Serafica were all assigned to St. Francis Mission.  Sr. Anthony was changed to Holy Rosary Mission.  Their places were taken by Sisters Bruno, Libia, Jolenta and Teresa.

In the middle of this excitement we were surprised by a quick visit from Mother Elma, Sr. George and Sr. Mildred.  Sr. Florence joined them when they left for Sioux City and also took part in the “back” inspection.  We hope all the “backs” are much better and we hope, too, that many Sisters will have reason for stopping for a visit.  We don’t wish any “backs” on them, though.

 

Our retreat began on August 8 under the direction of Father J. G. O’Flaherty, S.J.  It was his first retreat.  He said he supposed we knew it.  We did.  For a few days Nebraska put on some of its very hottest weather to add to the penance of retreat.  We lived through it and the retreat was good.  Following the retreat rather suddenly we had weather almost cold enough for frost.

A little repair work was done during the closing days of August.  The large sink had to be removed from the bathroom in the old cloister because it leaked and then the walls had to be painted again to cover the place where the sink had been.

An extra tray was needed in the children’s dishwashing room, so that was put in; and finally the furniture in the social room was re-covered and “upholstered” with some of our old bedding.  The room looks bright and cheerful again.

On August 29 the good news reached us that Mother Lidwina had been re-elected.  We hastened to send our congratulations to her and the other members of the Council.

September

There was a great deal of canning done during this month.  We had many “parties” of different kinds.  At some we could “sample” and at others we did not want to.  This was a hard month on the cooks.  Everything came at once.  God blessed us by sending some fine donations of fruit.  The prices were so high we could not afford to buy so God took care.

Registration for the day pupils was held on September 6.  There was not a noticeable decrease in the number of day pupils.  The next day the boarders began to come in and we were swamped! 

Many people had inquired about the school but had not said definitely that they were sending children.  When all the children began to swarm in we did not know where to put them to sleep.  We began to set up beds as fast as we could and finally made room for the twenty-one extra boarders.  It was the girls’ side that was so crowded.  The dining room too was overflowing.  We have had a number of applications since the opening of school but we cannot accommodate any more and we have begun to “brag” about our waiting list.  The “Omaha” girls were outstanding for homesickness and long distance phone calls.  It took about ten days to get some of the boarders into the spirit of school, and particularly of boarding school. 

On September 10 Stella Mary Crowe left for Marycrest.  Stella was graduated in May and is the representative of St. Mary’s for 1943.  Stella Wohlgemuth of New Mexico was already in Marycrest.  She represents the class of 1942.  May God give these girls the grace to persevere in His service.  Our prayers are with them.

The first school dance was given on September 16.  The purpose was to get acquainted and to initiate the Freshman class.  The new ones took the initiation in a good spirit and had a lovely time at the dance.

The Sisters had been joking for some time about the “Vacant Chair” of the First Assistant.  As one eye said to the other “There is something between us that smells”.  For a long time there had been no “smeller” on that chair.  At length on September 17 word came that Sister Teresa was appointed First Assistant and since then she has been the “Smeller”. 

On September 23 we received a Red Cross letter from Mother Alphonse.  The message has been sent to you and you have been as glad as we were to get work from “over there”.

October

The events of this month centered around school activities.  After clearing away all the reports to the State and to the County, we were ready for a change of work.  The Juniors lead the change with a mock trial.  One young lady had publicly and maliciously called another young lady a “Dumb-bell”, whereupon the victim sued the aforesaid young lady for $30,000 damage to health, social position, reputation, and scholastic standing.  The trial was conducted in real form in the assembly in the presence of pupils and friends.  The arguments and the cross-examination brought out some rare fun.  The accused finally was found guilty “whereupon” the students rush immediately to help the poor abused Junior to dispose of her $30,000.  Mr. Bill Froelich, who was present, thoroughly enjoyed the case and afterwards gave to the pupils his criticism on the conduct of the trial.  The class asked him to tell them the “inside” story of the Al Capone trial, so he explained to them that Al Capone was caught in a “backward” charge.  Capone had no bank account and no list of holdings for which he could be taxed, so the lawyers taxed him on the money he had spent.  They could prove that he had spent the money, therefore he must have had it, and therefore he should have been paying income tax on it.  Mr. Froelich said it was the first “backward” case in income tax history.

The second school dance in charge of the Juniors was a pleasant affair.  Jim Golden, in one of his usual clown stunts, was the attraction of the evening.

October 13 was chosen as Scrap Day.  After all the different drives that have been put on, there was not much left to gather up.  The children hurried around with trucks and wagons, eager to do their part to end this terrible war.  The day was windy and chilly.  By evening a big pile of scrap had been gathered.  As we did last year, the whole proceeds, about $200, was given to the USO and to the Red Cross.

We were called upon to give an extra donation especially for our own boys in service, so we decided to charge a little more for the third school dance and donate the proceeds to this cause.  The Sophomores took charge of this dance and gave a lovely evening to the whole school.  No one complained of the extra charge since it was going to our own boys through the hands of Mr. Edward Gallagher.

In sports our team is still on the green, undeveloped side.  The football showing was much better than last year in sensing the plays, team-work and endurance.  We still need maturity and that can only come with time.

During October we had many chilly days which needed furnace heat to make the building warm enough for school.  We hated to see the coal piles diminish because it is so hard to ship coal into this country.  The strikes made us worry and wonder whether we would have to close school.  Later in the month the weather warmed up and we were saved much expense.

November

The most important event this month was the visitation of dear Mother Erica.  We were especially eager to see her this year after her trip to the East.  We bombarded her with questions about this one and that one, about this place and that place until there was scarcely a person or a place left untalked about.

We could have used more recreations and could have asked many more questions if Mother had only stayed longer with us.

The Freshman class decided on formals for their pre-Advent social evening.  There were thrills aplenty and excitement all over the house as the formals arrived and were admired.  The Freshman class had a real orchestra and had garden decorations all around the gym.  It was a lovely evening both in appearance and in entertainment.

Armistice Day was so unpleasant that we could not have our usual parade this year.  A patriotic program was presented in the public school gym and then school was dismissed for the afternoon.

Our good workman, Frank Stutz, died on November 16.  He had been ailing for some time and had gone to the hospital in September.  He was ready to come home the afternoon he died.  He had kidney trouble and got a sudden heart attack.  He was dead within a few minutes.  We miss him very much.  He was a faithful worker, a good man, and an excellent gardener.

The Cecilia program was an operetta “Jeannie”.  The stage was really a picture;  the acting was good, and the singing showed careful training.  Since the audience is made up chiefly of fond parents and relatives, it was an appreciative audience.  We were impressed by the whole hearted response of the public school faculty and students, which shows that the good feeling which existed under Mr. Grill is still continuing. 

On the last day of November, Father Hallaron, S.J. of St. Louis opened the retreat for the students.  Father was experienced in handling young people and gave them a good retreat.  One point he made clear:  high school pupils are not adults and should not attend A2 shows.  We have had many arguments as to when students become adults.  Father argued that the government does not consider high school children adults, and that the very purpose of the listing of plays is to protect youth of high school age.  He stressed loyalty to the mind of the Church in such matters as attendance of A2 shows, going to shows during Advent, etc.  He was strict, but well liked.

December

The retreat served as a splendid preparation of the Sodality reception which was held on December 7.  There were thirty-two candidates.  The whole student body assembled in the chapel for the singing of the Office of the Blessed Virgin.  The candidate girls wore formals and veils; the boys wore their good suits.  Father Brick gave an explanation of the beautiful feast and then received the candidates into the Sodality.

The ceremony was closed with Benediction and the singing of Holy God, after which the students gathered in the assembly for a treat.  The reception was solemn and inspiring, simple yet beautiful.  May Our Lady bless these young people and keep them pure.

In spite of colds, coughs, headaches and pains, Nicholas found us all able to partake in his fun.  The good Saint had a great deal of trouble locating a few useful gifts for us because nearly everything we wanted was marked “not available”.  As usual, the middle table was the most attractive and when it drew near to the time for “grabbins” some of the “old” Sisters parked chairs right beside the table and sat and sat until the race began.  Most of our community belongs to the “old Sisters” since even those at the “cat’s table” are already wearing bi-focals.  The next table up have bi-focals and false teeth; those at the head table have bi-focals, false teeth and stiff knees.  It’s great to be old!

As soon as possible after December 8, the students begin to decorate the classrooms for Christmas.  There is a happy spirit of rivalry and much visiting to see what others are doing.  We did not expect to have trees this year, but we have them.  The windows have scenes painted on them; the blackboards are decorated; the gifts are being placed under the trees and there is a happy spirit throughout the school.

Looking back over the year we can think of many, many things for which to thank our good God.  The people of O’Neill have been most generous to us with donations of money and food.  It would really be hard at times to make ends meet but Our Lord has provided.  We have been spared from serious sickness throughout the year; our enrollment among the boarders has increased almost beyond capacity; God has blessed the farmers with crops and cattle so that children can be sent to school; our park has been a great source of beauty and joy for us; we have had many refreshing pleasant recreations spent in reading delightful stories; visiting priests have given us a chance to assist at many extra Masses; many children were instructed and prepared for their confession and their First Holy Communion; the interior of our old cloister has been made to look more monastic and it is much cleaner and warmer; the children have made progress in their studies, in Art, and in Music, so that our school has received public recognition in these different fields; our boys who have been called to service have stood well among the other students in the Army training classes; we have seen many a gorgeous sunset that only God could make; we have the night sky brilliant with stars, and the planets standing out in glory; and no where in the world is there so much sky as in Nebraska.  Of course there is another side to our memories also, but you are all as well acquainted with that side as we are, and you don’t like to dwell on that side either, so we shall close the pages of our memory book, both pleasant and unpleasant, and leave all in the hands of our good God Who will show us the worth of it all in eternity. 

 

Santa Claus will come on December 17 with a treat for each child; there will be a free movie for all; the pupils will assemble in the classrooms on the 22nd to distribute gifts; there will be the Christmas operetta in the afternoon and evening and then we shall call it year.  In the community we have planned a pleasant vacation of Franciscan joys.  A few of us may have to be absent for “interior” repairs during these days, but we hope it won’t take long.  We are looking forward to these days of rest, letters, and our retreat on the last day.  We have been able to secure the services of a priest for this day of grace and hope to bring the year to a peaceful close.  We offer best wishes to dear Mother Erica and to each Sister for a peaceful Christmas and a blessed New year.

 

Sisters

Mother Virginia

 

Sister Teresa

Sister Loretta

Sister Brigid

Sister Laurissa

Sister Edmunda

Sister Xavier

Sister Bruno

Sister Andrea

Sister Libia

Sister Flores

Sister Maxine

Sister Leonita

Sister Electa

Sister Agnesione

Sister Jolenta

Sister Laurita

Sister Fides

Sister Ludgardis

 

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