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Jul262010

1946 - "New Hospital Plans"

The Eve of the New Year was spent in a leisurely, quiet, meditative way under the direction of Father G. Stroh, S.J., from St. Francis Mission. The vitality injected into our spiritual lives gave us an auspicious beginning for 1946. The year was still in its infancy when the new born, or should one say the re-born, hospital project came into the limelight. The businessmen of O’Neill held a preliminary meeting for organizational purposes. They wished to launch the project correctly and plans had to be made. Mother Erica had met with the doctors and the businessmen in November and had agreed to staff and operate the hospital. The O’Neill citizens wished to erect it—or to do as much as they could financially to give it a start. Mr. William Froelich was elected general chairman, and committees for solicitation, building, publicity, and benefit were organized, each with its own chairman. The site of the new hospital will most likely be the small pasture land adjoining the Academy. The building should face south overlooking the beautiful Academy park.

Otherwise January passed in regular fashion, semester exams and all. The pilot for the children’s mid-year flight along the skyways of prayer was the Reverend Joseph Blank, S.J., from St. Louis. Father was a strong promoter of religious vocations, and had a dozen or more who sought conferences with him on the subject. The results will show up in God’s good time.

February held more committee meetings for deliberation and planning of the new hospital.  Dr. Martin Aitken of Lincoln, personal friend of Mr. Froelich, was asked to draw up tentative plans for a 35 to 50 bed hospital, so that proper estimates for construction costs could be made. The lowest figure now, for the building unfurnished is 110,000 dollars.

On St. Valentine’s Day, the Freshmen entertained with a formal party and dance. Figure dances were an interesting addition to the entertainment. At an election held earlier in the day, the school’s most truly representative students were chosen as King and Queen. James Merriman and Sheila Taffe carried off the honors.

Mother Erica found it convenient to stop over for a few hours on her way to St. Francis. That short visit made February 22 memorable.

All the while that scholastic and social affairs were forging slowly and steadily forward, athletic events took no back seat. As always, these latter events stood out as significant, interesting and time consuming. The boys can always draw a large crowd for home games as well as for those out of town. Their victories this year balanced their defeats. But in both tournaments, district and county, their showing was poor. In the County meet, they came within sight of the semi-finals; in the district, they played two games. It was St. Mary’s unfailing fortune to meet St. Joseph’s of Atkinson in the earlier rounds. This latter quintet went to Lincoln and won the State championship.

March brought and epidemic of measles, especially inconvenient among the boarders. No serious consequences resulted, and in three weeks we thanked God for the end of the siege.

The “Bells of St. Mary’s” came to O’Neill, and we chose the stormiest day of the month for a school showing. The blizzard prevented neighboring Sisters and priests from seeing the picture, as planned, but very few of our children failed to see it.

For the first time in history, St. Mary’s entered students in the regional declamatory Contest. Three of the four entries won superior ratings at Wayne on March 23.  On April 6, these three went to Lincoln for the State Speech Festival and won top honors again.

The first week end in April was Sodality Convention week in Omaha. Twenty-five Sodalists, accompanied by their teachers, made the trip by car or train, and came home renewed in zeal for the cause. The trip had its advantages in social training, and in its broadening effect on many of our children who otherwise see very little of city life.

Fire marshals from Lincoln can in mid-April to conduct a fire prevention campaign. The demonstration they staged for the school children was highly entertaining as well as educational. Any group of educators who go in so strongly for visual aids that they will not hesitate to carry along “Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow” could not fail to be entertaining.

Easter time was an exceptionally busy time. The strains of the glorious Alleluias mingled with other joyful melodies. Father Joseph Hargarten, with his mother and father, came to visit Sister Agnesine. Sisters Electa and Leonite had the exceptionally good fortune of being able to attend the National Catholic Educational Association Convention held in St. Louis during Easter week. The people at home had the joy of welcoming Mother Virginia and Sister Constance, with their thirty some contestants for the Music Festival. Mrs. Edward Johnson, of Omaha, embraced the opportunity of visiting two Sisters at once, Sister Laurisse and Sister Constance, and St. Mary’s was glad to have her here for a few days. Then the whole institution turned musical; and Saturday morning, when the St. Agnes delegation left they carried with them many high honors. Our own children made a good showing also. Supporters of other schools were heard to comment wonderingly on the large number of superiors awarded to the two Catholic schools that participated.

In spite of all the preparations for a successful Music Week, the boys found time and readiness for their annual substantial athletic banquet. This year the pep club girls, who had given yeoman service in athletic events, were also invited to the party. This affair is always held down town and does not involve extra work for anyone at St. Mary’s, except the coaches and managers.

April breezed out and May floated in with a succession of farewell parties for the Prefect of the Boys’ Sodality, William Froelich, Jr., who was leaving for the Jesuit Novitiate on May 6. On May 13, Bill had received his cassock, and by the time his class was graduating, Bill had begun his noviceship in earnest.

Other than the visit of Sister Laurita’s brother and family, school events took all our time and our concentrated attention during May. There were movies, this time scenes from Julius Caesar and Macbeth, class outings, and some few publicity stunts. Our musicians, both band and vocal students, traveled to Norfolk to broadcast their repertoire. Although the day was cloudy and there was too much static to insure good reception, the trip was both educational and entertaining.  The amateur musicians had opportunity to display their merits at home also. Sister Edmunda’s pupils gave their recital for mothers and friends on May 4. Sisters Flores and Laurita presented their pupils on May 13, and the recital took the form of a music contest with senior music students acting as judges.

The junior-senior banquet had been held on May 2, before Bill Froelich’s departure; the Catholic Daughters had a corporate Communion breakfast on May 5; the annual Alumni reunion and banquet was held on May 19. Parenthetically, St. Mary’s students learned to be expert caterers, and Sister Electa acquired the poise of a Waldorf-Astoria maitre d’hotel. The Alumni reunion this year was significant for the fact that the dinner program was directed and carried through by men only. On this occasion, and perhaps because of the splendid performance of our boys in fields at home and afar, the Association passed a resolution that at last St. Mary’s Alumnae would bow to its masculine element and they declared themselves officially St. Mary’s Alumni. A note to this effect was to e sent to our Omaha Chapter.

There was a State Library Convention held in our little city on May 14. Sister Electa was chosen to read a paper before the group. Sister found that her library science training in Denver served her adequately on this occasion. Having had little time for immediate preparation, she could repeat a similar performance at a Denver University. The librarians were pleased with her contribution and consulted her on further questions.

On May 15 the Seniors, under the direction of Sister Laurissa, produced their class play, “Almost Eighteen”. This is a play with a message, and yet has a modern setting and is up to date. It is rather hard to produce but the results were most satisfying. Public approval was spontaneous.

In the last weeks things began happening fast. May 20 was the annual May crowning, held in our parish church this year because it rained. Besides a late frost had frozen all the spring flowers and the Academy park was rather barren looking. Many enthusiasts believed the church ceremony more effective.

May 21 was the Spring Formal—this year a Sodality project. The Freshmen had a fish pond as a side issue, and all the classes had preceded this affair with cake, ice cream, or wiener sales. The object was to raise funds to enable delegates to attend the Summer School of Catholic Action in Chicago. Nearly  one   hundred dollars was netted, and as later events proved, it was adequate.

On May 28 the seniors held their class night exercises in the public school auditorium. They paged through a life size photo album and the pictures came to life under the glow of colored lights. Their prophecy was a series of caricatures cast on the screen by an electric lantern.

May 29 was graduation day. Twenty one girls and ten boys were awarded diplomas in St. Patrick’s Church. Father John O’Brien of Emmet was the speaker for the occasion and delivered a meaningful sermon on the obligation of lay Catholics in a changing world.

This year two St. Mary’s students, Edward Hynes and Lou Ann Iler, were privileged to represent their school at Boys’ State and Girls’ State in Lincoln. They spent a week there taking over the State offices from Governor to prosecuting attorney. They were sponsored by the American Legion and other local fraternities.

Our own children were still with us when other children’s voices call to us as   to St. Patrick of old. These, too, wanted to hear the good tidings. They were the hundreds of young people in the surrounding country parishes. The grade teachers started vacation schools on May 26. Sisters Jolenta and Doloretta spent two weeks at St. John’s at Deloit; Sisters Laurissa and Flores drove to Emmet every day for three weeks; Sister Marciana and Bernard came from the Mission to help us out at Chambers; Sisters Agnesine, Electa and Antonella enjoyed two weeks at St. Peter’s in Ewing. Sister Leonita kept her own First Communion class until the first Sunday of June. Besides this activity, Confirmation classes at home continued until June 3, when the Most Reverend Bishop Hunkeler, D.D., of Grand Island, conferred the Sacrament of Confirmation on a large class of over 200 children.

While some were still away at their various mission fields, others began the summer school “trek.” Sisters Fides and Laurita started the ball rolling by reporting for registration at Creighton University on June 10. Sisters Jolenta, Leonita and Doloretta registered for another summer at St. Ambrose, Davenport, Iowa; and Sister Agnesine spent her vacation cramming at Loras College in Dubuque. While these Sisters were still packing to go, Sisters Margaret and Agnesita were already at St. Francis Mission, South Dakota, in deep solitude. After their eight days of spiritual brushing up and polishing the came home to edify a rapidly diminishing community. Before their return things had been happening in rapid succession. Mother Immaculata had made a seemingly innocent call at the doctor’s office to examine into a persistent eye infection. Dr. Finley referred her to a specialist in Norfolk, and this doctor, in turn, referred her to more skilled physicians. Mother, without even an extra handkerchief or a toothbrush, borrowed a clergy book from the Norfolk Sisters and left for Denver. Little did she dream then that she would not return to St. Mary’s until August.

Everything goes wrong when Mother is away! Mr. Kettler, the Omaha contractor, who had begun the repair and redecorating of our building, had a special kind of difficulty. He could not obtain materials, he lacked skilled help, his unskilled labor made unreasonable demands; Mr. Kettler himself was called away for ten days at a time and then some of his men did take advantage and celebrate! It was a worry with all these men in the house. It was a discomfort, walking through debris whichever way one went. It was an annoyance breathing plaster dust and related odors instead of God’s fresh air all summer. It was work cleaning up after the men. But it is a joy that the Academy is rejuvenated. Crumbling plaster is now solid walls that had felt no paint in thirty years are now things of beauty. There is a new infirmary with bath for the children on the fourth floor, the Sodality chapel is planked with NuWood, the high school corridor and the gym have tile ceilings, the music department saw some remodeling and the entire Academy, classrooms, corridors and gym were repainted. All our difficulties were rewarded.

With piles of broken plaster, sand, paint buckets and scaffolding for a background, St. Mary’s offered hospitality to many summer guests. Sister Doloretta’s parents, the Miller’s from Cody, Wyoming, spent some few pleasant days with Sister in early June. Father James Mackin, S.J., nephew of Sister Electa, came up from Creighton to spend a few treasured hours with Sister. Father had just finished his tertianship in Washington and was enroute to the eastern province.

Sister Dorothy, a Good Shepherd extern sister, comes out state from Omaha quite frequently soliciting help from our generous O’Neillers. She and her companion came in on us when there was full house in the guest quarters and only dormitories, in amid state of ruin and registering 106 degrees Fahrenheit were available. Sister is easy to please and she was made to feel at home in spite of everything.

At nine o’clock the same evening of Sister Dorothy’s arrival, a cry went up that there was a broken water pipe somewhere. A miniature Niagara Falls and Yosemite combined was racing down the back stairs from dormitory to gym. What really happened was that our lay help had attempted to do their washing upstairs while the city pressure was low. There was no water, so they blissfully left the faucets open and went downtown to the show. They wouldn’t be home until eleven thirty. We waded through three inches of water, shut off the faucets, then proceeded to scoop and mop up dormitory, wash room, stairs, classroom, and gym. It was nearly eleven when that was completed. Incidentally, Mr. Kettler assured us that the new plaster that had received a thorough soaking was not damaged. Before we had wrung the last mop, more company was announced. Four Schneider’s from Orrin, North Dakota, were here to visit Sisters Ludgardis and Margaret. Now to find them a bed! With old curtains not yet sent to the laundry, with sheets and blankets gathered from everywhere, we proceeded to section off some more dormitory space for our guests. Before midnight we had our poor quarters ready, and our guests were happy to stay some four days.

June was a full month and its climax was worth every effort that had been made to “keep the fires burning” while Mother was away. Mother Erica permitted three Sisters, Sisters Laurissa, Electa and Antonella to attend the “six days you will never forget”—the Catholic Action School in Chicago. They left June 29. Traveling and hotel expenses were paid by Mr. William Froelich and the Sodality fund diminished by only thirty eight dollars as the result of the trip. Those six days, July 1 to July 7, were indeed unforgettable, and the results are being felt in the year’s Sodality work. Friends that we made in Chicago have visited St. Mary’s since, of course with Mr. Froelich as host. Mr. Kelly, brother of the former mayor of Chicago, was among them, and he left a substantial contribution toward our repair fund.

Hardly had we doffed our traveling attire when blue aprons and sleeves beckoned. All July was house cleaning month. Eight little girls who are eager to earn board or tuition for the ensuing school year helped scrape paint from woodwork and floors and then clean and wax each room as the painters finished. This work had not even begun properly when Sister Flores and Sister Agnesita were summoned to Denver, the former to take a needed rest and the latter to study the intricate skills of sewing under Sister Raineldis’ direction. Sister Marciana, from St. Francis, gave generously of her time and patience, to substitute for both. She was organist, portress, seamstress, and general utility Sister for the entire summer. Sister is just another example of a big heart and ready hand, and St. Mary’s needed her at this time as never before.

Sisters Rena and Bartholomew from Mother Virginia’s community in Alliance spent the summer here studying art under Sister Maxine. Their exhibit at the end of the session proved that they had learned a great deal. Besides acquiring knowledge and skill they had also earned the gratitude of the Sisters for their willingness and generosity in offering a helping hand. Sister Rena took care of the chapel during Sister Dolretta’s absence, and Sister Bartholomew filled in wherever emergency called.

In more ways than one, St. Mary’s is quite “out of this world,” so much so that when young Sisters enroute to Denver for profession or middle aged Sisters enroute to summer school make this their stop-over we are both surprised and happy. This summer’s pauses were especially welcomed because our guest Sisters made it a three days’ visit sometimes, and even spent occasional hours in the laundry. Guests are not always treated like that; in fact, we could promise to do differently in the future, except that the Sisters themselves made us feel that it was their privilege. Perhaps these young Sisters like us that way; we surely loved them for their helpfulness. They were friends in need.

August, 1946, will always be memorable. Mother Immaculata returned in time to keep Retreat with the Sisters. The retreat, from August 4 to August 11, was conducted by Rev. G. Stroh, S.J., from St. Francis, and was an inspiring and consoling one. A veteran in the field always has many helpful experiences to relate that edify and encourage his hearers. Father Stroh offered to remain two days longer to help celebrate Mother’s silver Jubilee. Only the priests and Mother’s immediate relatives had been informed about the Jubilee, for which reason the celebration was simple and homelike. Father Joseph Hargarten, visiting Sister Agnesine at the time, was as eager as Father Lisco to have a Solemn High Mass. So, for the first time in many years, our little chapel was the scene of this most solemn of all functions, with Father Stroh as celebrant. Monsignor McNamara gave Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament later in the day. The day was spent between cloister and chapel and proved to be perfect in every way. Sister Marie Helen, O.P., Mother’s older Sister, could not be present, but she visited here for several days the following week.

Shortly after these festivities, while Jubilee bells still echoed in cloister halls, a celebration of another kind was staged. Sister Jolenta and Leonita had proudly borne home their hard earned sheepskins at the end of an unusually strenuous summer. Recognition came to them in the form of a Franciscan graduation party, guest speakers and all. Mother Immaculata conferred the usual decorations.

Farewells and welcomes are still to be recorded. They are constant reminders to be in readiness for any assignment. His appointments they are, and in this spirit we gave up Sister Agnesita and Sister Margaret, whose places were filled by Sister Serafica and a lay cook. Sister Ferdinand came to take grades three and four, so that Sister Edmunda could be released for music. Sister Casilda from Denver replaced Sister Doloretta, and Sister Emilia came from Holy Rosary to take Sister Laurissa’s freshmen. Sister Laurissa went to St. Agnes, Alliance. Sister Serafica has taken over the sewing and portress work, besides her care of the Chapel and the sick. In this was Mother has been released from much additional work that she tried to do last year.

Registration for the new school year began on August 30 and 31. The boarders came in on September 1 and 2. When classes opened and we had time to compare notes, it was discovered that the grade school enrollment had remained the same as last year’s, hovering around the 200 mark. The high school claims an increase of ten, having 169. Not being able to get Mrs. George this year to help is telling on our classes. Many groups number as high as 46 in one room. The diocesan superintendent of schools, Father P.E.  Schneider of Omaha, made his biennial visit in that week of organization. He seemed pleased with his observation and was encouraging in his comments on our work.

School for many high school boys means athletics. Their teachers are grateful that there is such an outlet for their energy and pugnacity and they usually urge the boys on to great endeavor in this line. St. Mary’s made an auspicious beginning by walking to an easy victory over the Alumni boys. Did this victory give them false assurance, or were there other elements combining against them?  At any rate, the football season was only “middling” or fair. The boys had to chalk up as many defeats as victories, and every fame resulted in broken ribs, arms or teeth. They had the fighting spirit but not  the skill, it seems. The big event of the football season was a homecoming game against St. Mary’s of Grand Island. The visitors won the game, but we took other honors. The band and pep club put on a spectacular exhibit, and the crowning of the football Queen at the evening party while the orchestra played “The Bells of St. Mary’s” was a thrilling experience for the children. The following week, our boys won against the only undefeated Catholic school in the State, St. Patrick of North Platte. That’s football!

The students had the opportunity during September to see Cronin’s “Green Years” downtown. The progress of pictures shown in our own assembly continued the same as last year, though we were still using a projector, lent by the company until our own could be shipped.

The Feast of St. Francis came on Friday and taking a holiday meant a long week end for the boarders. Many of them went to their homes and we enjoyed a real Feast day, Friday and all.

Mid October witnessed the first of the annual series of banquets. Our student caterers served a hundred seventy plate banquet in their usual expert style. Clean up takes an hour after such occasions, and we are all set for the next one.  The serving business has developed into a systemized routine now, and we are nearly ready to hang out our shingle!

November was Vocation month at St. Mary’s. Bulletin boards, class room instructions, group discussions, and special prayer programs had for their object that the good Master “send laborers into His vineyard.” Brother Fymard from the juniorate of the Holy Cross Brothers came in the second week of the month and gave an illustrated talk on the life of a Brother. Now is the time to follow the call, he urged. It should not be put off until next month or next year, but be followed as soon as possible, anywhere from eighth grade beyond high school. There are about sixteen junior boys. All of them want to be Holy Cross brothers. Brother Fymard certainly was a convincing speaker and his talk went directly to the heart. The soil is good, the seed has been planted; cultivation must continue, and then fruition! Incidentally, Brother Fymard put in a word for the Sisterhoods, and in particular for the Sisters who were teaching these children.

Grades 7 and 8, also with several boys as prospective Brothers, threw themselves whole heartedly into the need of the immediate present and sponsored a baby bazaar for the Missions. They netted more than seventy five dollars on their project. They feel quite competent about their ability.

The music department presented an operetta, “The Beauty Contest” early in the month and offered the proceeds to help pay for new parlor furniture. The parlors and guest rooms had been redecorated in late October and  now they are almost “dreams” in their pastel shade walls and harmonizing furniture, Venetian blinds, and new drapes. At last the casual visitor will notice something different from what he had found for the past twenty years.

Just before Thanksgiving, several chosen vocal and instrumental students had the privilege of attending a State Music Clinic in Lincoln. The comments, appraisals, and criticisms earned there will be an advantage to these students and their teachers in preparing for the spring Music Contest.

December meant Retreat for the students. December 3, 4, and 5 were the grand days, and our vivacious hundred and sixty turned angelic for that many days. Father James Bartholomew of Trinity College, Sioux City, piloted these eager sky travelers in their exploration of the Heavens. He measured up to the expectations, and youth is keen and sometimes caustic in its evaluation and judgment. Father told us we had good children and that many of our girls are vocation minded. May God direct them aright!

The number of candidates for reception into Our Lady’s Sodality had increased noticeably. It is no longer possible to have a beautiful reception ceremony with the whole Sodality present in our little Chapel. Monsignor was most gracious about permitting us to have the ceremony in Church. Here it was an imposing service; parents could be there to witness the reception; and the forty seven new Children of Mary felt singularly blessed on this occasion. Father Bartholomew waited over for the Reception and gave a beautiful sermon.

The little Freshmen planned a Mission project for December—two one-act plays staged for the benefit of the Missions. They were quite successful both financially and dramatically. Here is a splendid way to uncover latent abilities in dramatics and in leadership.

The following week, the day pupils’ girls’ Sodality, at the request of the Alumni officers, sponsored a cafeteria, cake sale, and bingo party   for Alumni benefit. This group has been planning for a great day to come, our Monsignor’s golden jubilee in March. Parish and school hope to make it a memorable day for their beloved pastor.

And finally the movie projector has arrived, latest DeVry and latest price! But operators, Sisters, and children are crowing over it as a child would over its first mechanical toy, and we hope to derive both pleasure and benefit from its use.

Then came the last week of school. The Christmas spirit abounded. On Monday the students attended the movie “The Old Curiosity Shop” in our gym. On Tuesday, Mrs. Rasley invited us to a free show down town. On Wednesday our basket ball team met last year’s State Champions, St. Joseph’s, of Atkinson, and held them down to a 40-10 victory. That was splendid, considering our inexperience and their skill. On Thursday, the boarders were served their traditional formal banquet by the Sisters. It is fun to be chefs, waitresses, and dishwashers, all at once for ONE evening in the year! On that same evening our athletes were being entertained and feasted by the Knights of Columbus in the KC hall.

One of the last Sodality meetings of the year was made memorable for the day pupils because of a talk on Theresa Newmann by Mrs. Carroll Stewart of O’Neill. This lady had been an army nurse and in that capacity had had the opportunity and privilege of visiting the home of the famed Stigmatist and of speaking personally with her. Mrs. Stewart gave both facts and impressions she gathered, and the girls seemed to derive inspiration from her talk.

School came to a close with the singing of carols for Monsignor and the Sisters and the distribution of gifts on Friday afternoon.

Christmas vacation is the most peaceful and homelike time of all the year, and tired workers in God’s vineyard can pause at the half mile and rest a little. It is a time of extra prayer for friends, benefactors, and loved ones, and a time to wish all our companions in the field a beautiful, graceladen Christmas time and a blessed New Year.

The year comes to a close with a day of solitude and spiritual exercises, conducted this year by Father James Bartholomew, whom the children liked so well that he was invited back. Under his guidance we pray to draw nearer to Jesus and Mary, and may our prayers for our Sisters gather us all under Mary’s blue mantle and keep us there the whole year through. May our labors spread her influence.

Mother Immaculata, Sisters Antonella, Brigid, Edmunda, Bruno, Maxine, Electa, Jolenta, Fides, Casilda, Andrea, Serafica, Emilia, Flores, Leonita, Agnesine, Laurita, Ferdinand, and Ludgardis.

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